11.4.17

NORMALIZING MOBILITY – IMAGINED DIASPORAS

How can migration and mobility be discussed without problematizing them? How do visions of life in the diaspora create images of alternative futures?

15.00 – 16.30

ROUND TABLE

With Emeka Alams (artist, Seattle), Linda Gitau (Human Rights Lawyer working on refugee matters), Dr. Joost Fontein (Director BIEA), and Prof. Bengt G. Karlsson (Social Anthropologist)

Moderation: Dr. Ulf Vierke (Director Iwalewahaus, University of Bayreuth)

 

IDENTITIES IN FLUX: “QUEERING FUTURES”

In which ways are shared identities and a sense of belonging relevant for social movements and the (trans-)formation of future? Where are women (artists) and queer identities situated within a patriarchal, heteronormative society of the 21st century?       The discrimination of intersecting social identities is yet to be understood on many levels. Meanwhile, xenophobia, islamophobia, and homophobia (amongst others) are still on the rise in many countries, both in the global south and north. Nevertheless the formation and recognition of multiple and fluid identities within society are creating diverse possibilities for future social progress beyond nation building. Which influence does the (imagined or lived) queer diaspora have on envisioning Africa’s future in this regard?

16.30 – 17.00

WALK-ABOUT IN THE EXHIBITION

With Neo Musangi (Queer thinker) and Prof. Dr. Ulrike Bergermann (media scholar, Art University Braunschweig), with a focus on the works of Abdi Osman, Ato Malinda and the kitchen table digital diaspora collective

Venue: Aga Khan Hall

17.00 – 18.30

ROUND TABLE

Queer Lives, Futures, and Spaces

With Immah Reid (AFRA Kenya – Artists For Recognition and Acceptance), Neo Musangi (Queer thinker), Ruth Kimani (Hivos, Nairobi) and Prof. Dr. Sybille Bauriedl (University of Graz: FAVT-Exhibition contribution “Queer Volatility”)

Moderation and Input: Kevin Mwachiro (Hivos, Nairobi)

 

HEALING HURTS. AESTHETIC AND ARCHIVAL PRACTICES ADDRESSING TRAUMATIZING PASTS. 

Society’s traumas – such as the colonial encounter and post-colonial hegemony – are resonating across generations and have a determining influence on current political situations. A number of examples, in relation to the exhibition, are discussed here: ‘Tracks and Traces‘ are investigated, futures arising from the confronting of past trauma discussed. How does art enable processes of healing, of imagining alternative futures?

19.00 – 20.00

BOOK PRESENTATION*

Dr. Katharina Fink, Dr. Sam Ndogo, Dr. Nadine Siegert: Tracks and Traces of Violence Collective (BIGSAS): Tracks and Traces of Violence. LIT, 2017.

followed by a

WALK-ABOUT IN THE EXHIBITION

with artists Philipp Khabo Koepsell, and curators Dr. Katharina Fink and Dr. Nadine Siegert with a focus on the works of Kiluanji Kia Henda, Ingrid La Fleur, Kitso Lynn Lelliott, Philipp Khabo Koepsell, Emeka Alams & Zohra Opoku.

Venue: Aga Khan Hall

20.00

ROUND TABLE

Healing Hurts. Aesthetic and archival practices addressing traumatizing pasts.

Input by Prof. Dr. Ulrike Bergermann (Art University Braunschweig): “Violence and the question of repetition in art”

With Wambui Kamiru Collymore (artist & curator, Nairobi), Dr. Godwin Siundu (University of Nairobi), Philipp Khabo Koepsell (artist, Berlin), and Muchangi Nyaga (Extra Judicial Executions and Police Brutality, Mathare Social Justice Centre)

Moderation: Dr. Nadine Siegert (Iwalewahaus, Bayreuth)

*The presented publications are available in the museum’s book store