UNTITLED

Get some insights and additional information on James Muriuki´s photography and video installation Untitled, exploring the materialistic manifestations of Middle Class aspirations in Kenya.

Booklet Untitled

FALLEN

“If the theory is correct that feeling is not located in the head, that we sentiently experience a window, a cloud, a tree not in our brains but rather in the place where we see it, then we are, in looking at our beloved, too, outside ourselves.”
Walter Benjamin, Einbahnstraße, 1928

Zohra Opoku’s and Emeka Alams’ first collaborative installation presents a figure resembling a fragmented angel. The work is assembled from remnant textiles gathered in Lagos, Nigeria and combined with objects and a black banner carrying abstract symbols. The installation poses questions that run like threads through the exhibition as a whole: Is “future” necessarily a fragment, a new combination of existing material, rather than a solid vision or a linear story? Looking at the installation, Walter Benjamin’s famous “Angel of History” comes to mind: staring at
the past, unable to interact, heal or alter it, the angel is pushed towards the future. There are many other possible perspectives on futures as the fragmented angel here suggests, looking to all directions, simultaneously.

WARNING! NOT FIXED

We are proud to give you a little insight on the project of Ulf Vierke and Delio Jasse, Warning! Not Fixed

Warning! Not Fixed is a story about the act of looking and the illusion of images. It highlights the ephemeral that is also characteristic for this end of photography as process. There is one central question: How does the process of remembrance work? Images, namely strong images or artworks in our memory are different from what we usually call knowledge. Images ‘adhere’, they stick to our memory usually without being on hand immediately. But do they really become disposable in the sense of applicable knowledge later on? The hypothesis underlying our experimental installation rather assumes that the initial image stays intact without being remembered as such; in the process of remembering the image we create new images instead of bringing back the initial one. Thus like retouches we put layer over layer of new-remembered images on top of the initial one. A consequence of the “remembering” is not a destruction but distancing of the original image. In our installation every individual act of looking at the image pushes one-step away from the initial image. The individual process of remembering described above is turned into a collective process. Warning! Not Fixed is as much about the individual’s process of remembering an image, as it is about the collective venture “archive”. The archive unfolds as a process not that much about the past but about futures, possible future remembrance.

MY MOTHER´S MOTHER

We are more than happy to give you a little preview on the exciting project My Mother´s Mother by Syowia Kiambi.

The work My Mother’s Mother is a room installation that fuses women´s voices from both German and Kenyan urban spaces, women living in the middle class milieu. The domestic references created with wallpaper, floor laminates, curtains and ceramic cups symbolize both fragility and strength.

We all have aspirations for a better life that goes beyond the basics of food, shelter, income and love. Often the idea of what this life should consist of is influenced by the consumer market, is governed by our educational and work environment and influenced by political, business and social agenda´s. Thinking that we make choices completely on our own accord is wishful thinking. Gender issues are extremely coded and elusive to grasp in their entirety. Women are the backbone of social structures and they in various ways, hold varying degrees of influence, utilising often-subversive approaches in the shaping of our lives.

In the work My Mother´s Mother you will hear a few voices some content with their lives but most are in a battle of self-preservation.

ZOHRA OPOKU

Zohra Opoku (DE/GH) is an Accra-based versatile artist whose work employs media including installations, photography and video to explore the sophistication of textile cultures in disparate spaces targeting fashion’s political and psychological role and socio-cultural dynamics in relation to African history and individualistic or societal identities.
This experience enroots her aesthetic practice into sculptural modules as her [in]direct social commentary as seen in THE BILLBOARDPROJECT, composed of big scale installations of second-hand clothes which were displayed in central Accra. She is employing metaphors of repetition and disguise in her portrait series TEXTURES and SIDESPECIFIC presented in specifically identified locations.
Opoku holds an MA (2003) in Fashion from the Hamburg University of Applied Sciences. Her residencies include Art OMI, Ghent (NY/2012)/, Iwalewa Haus Bayreuth (DE/2013) and Jan van Eyck Institute (NL/2014). Opoku was recently awarded a fellowship for the Kala Institute Berkeley (CA/2015). She is included in the touring group exhibitions Making Africa (2015-20) curated by Amelie Klein and Okwui Enwezor. Upcoming exhibitions include the Material Effects curated by Yesomi Umolu at Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan and Designing Futures curated by Christina de Middel at the LagosPhoto Festival 2015.