NADINE SIEGERT

Nadine Siegert is the Deputy Director of Iwalewahaus, University of Bayreuth. She studied Cultural Anthropology at the University of Mainz,
where she worked in the African Music Archive until 2008. In 2012, she finished her PhD thesis on Angolan Contemporary Art Production. Since 2007, she curated exhibitions such as Nástio Mosquito – Dzzzz (Bayreuth 2008), António Ole – Hidden Pages (Bayreuth 2009), Contrary Alignment (Nairobi 2009), Portraits of a Slippery Look (Nairobi 2010), GhostBusters I and II (Berlin 2010/2013), and Mash Up (Bayreuth 2015).

She is an Associated Project Leader of sub-project 5, Revolution 3.0 and forms part of the curatorial team of the upcoming exhibition, Future
Africa – Visions in Time.

http://www.iwalewa.uni-bayreuth.de/de/index.html

http://www.buala.org/en/autor/nadine-siegert

LUIS CARLOS PATRAQUIM

Luís Carlos Patraquim (Maputo, March 26, 1953) is a poet, playwright and journalist from Mozambique.

He moved to Sweden as a refugee in 1973. In 1975, he moved back to Mozambique, where he worked for A Tribuna magazine, the Agência de Informação de Moçambique (AIM), the Instituto Nacional de Cinema de Moçambique (INC) and Tempo magazine.

He has lived in Portugal since 1986.

Some of his works include:

Mariscando luas. Lisboa, Vega, 1992

Com Chichorro (ilustrações) e Ana Mafalda Leite

Lidemburgo blues. Lisboa, Editorial Caminho, 1997

O osso côncavo e outros poemas (1980–2004). Lisboa, Editorial Caminho, 2005

Antologia de poemas dos livros anteriores e poemas novos

Com um texto de Ana Mafalda Leite: O que sou de sobrepostas vozes

Pneuma Lisboa, Editorial Caminho, 2009

A Canção de Zefanías Sforza (romance) Porto, Porto Editora, 2010

Antologia Poética. Belo Horizonte, Editora UFMG, 2011. Coleção Poetas de Moçambique

PICTURE: https://sunshinesocialistcinema.wordpress.com/2013/03/17/the-birth-of-cinema-in-mozambique/

REVOLUTION 3.0

The research project investigates the entanglements of aesthetics and politics in situations of radical social transformation, and the becoming of icons. What constitutes the ‘seismographic power’ of images, and the sustainability of icons in terms of radicalism? Central to our investigation are diachronic and transcultural filiations within visual culture in the ‚longue durée‘of lusophone Africa. These images are part of visual memory cultures and are enmeshed in thriving political-social movements and recent medial transformations. Our research firstly focuses on Mozambique, particularly because of the foundation of „Instituto Nacional de Cinema“ right after independence in 1975; established in order to produce and promote ‚homemade‘ images for Mozambicans; and conceptualized as a contrast to colonial imageries. Furthermore, Mozambique as part of the „socialist international“ formed an integral part of political dynamics (eg in Algeria, Angola, Namibia, Burkina Faso, Guinea Bissau), which found its expression in the iconographies of the time. This internationalism, both ideological and factual, resulted in references and relations which reach beyond Africa as a continent (and connect with, eg, Cuba, GDR, Chile). Contemporary visions of futures seem to meander between political-economic pragmatism and nostalgic utopias and evoke the question of actual ‘originality’. The core question here is the negotiation of recent and historical imaginations of future in iconographies of revolutions; and the investigation of visual archives. The research is located at the triangle of fine arts, film and virtual imageries in digital media such as the internet. “Revolution 3.0” is one of the five research projects of the interdisciplinary Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies.

Picture: © Nayko – http://www.redbubble.com/people/nayko

Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies

Founded in October 2012 and inaugurated in a festive event on December 3rd, 2012, the “Bayreuth Academy of Advanced African Studies” will expand the horizon of the well-established field of African Studies at this University at international, national and local levels. Across a broad range of disciplines, it will open dialogues with other Area Studies as well as with fields of research dedicated to ‘systematic’ (i.e. non-regional) approaches. Thus, in its first phase (2012-2016), the Bayreuth Academy will fathom concepts of the future emerging from Africa and its diasporas from different academic perspectives. An essential concern is to engage in general debates about the concept of ‘future’ through insights gained from regional research, notably African Studies. The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is funding this project and the setting up of its institutional structures during the next four years.

Future – Concepts